Hearing Loss

Hearing loss is the third most common physical condition in the United States, following heart disease and diabetes respectively. It affects 20% of the population, or 48 million Americans. The rate of hearing loss rises within older populations of Americans, with one in three people over 65 experiencing some degree of hearing loss, and 50% of people over 75 experiencing some degree of hearing loss. In the workforce, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) estimates that 60% of people experience some degree of hearing loss. Similarly, 60% of veterans returning from combat zones report incidents of hearing loss and tinnitus (ringing of the ears). In recent years, the rate of hearing loss has grown in younger populations due to the ubiquity of earbuds and personal electronic devices. Hearing loss has often been linked with age, but is also a product of exposure to noise over an extended period of time.


There Are
0 Million
Americans with Hearing Loss

Signs of Hearing Loss



  • Turning up the TV Volume
  • Difficulty in Noisy Places
  • Difficulty on the Phone
  • Thinking that everyone mumbles
  • Asking people to repeat

Hearing loss is an invisible condition, making it difficult to recognize immediately. Often times, people will notice changes in their hearing but are not aware that it is hearing loss. Common signs of hearing loss include: increasing the volume on TV, stereos, and other forms of media; difficulty with speech recognition, including asking people to repeat themselves or thinking that everybody is mumbling; mishearing or misunderstanding conversations; avoiding social settings and interactions; feeling stress, frustration, or annoyance in interactions; and experiencing difficulty hearing in a noisy situation.

Causes of Hearing Loss


There are three types of hearing loss, with corresponding causes.

Conductive hearing loss affects the outer and middle ear. Any impediment in conducting sound waves through these portions of the ear will lead to conductive hearing loss. This includes congenital conditions, blockage due to earwax in the ear canal, issues with the ear bones, rupture or injury to the ear drum, or inflammation due to infection, to name a few. Sensorineural hearing loss relates to the inner ear, where inner ear hair cells translate sound wave vibrations into neural signals. These signals are sent to the auditory nerve in the brain, where they are registered as recognizable sounds. Sensorineural hearing loss occurs when there is damage to the hair cells, which do not regenerate once damaged. This may be caused by aging, noise-induced hearing loss, injury, or certain classes of ototoxic medication, to name a few. A combination of the above two forms of hearing loss is considered mixed hearing loss. This may be caused by a number of factors affecting various parts of the ear.


How to Protect Yourself from Hearing Loss



Hearing loss is an invisible condition, making it difficult to recognize immediately. Often times, people will notice changes in their hearing but are not aware that it is hearing loss. Common signs of hearing loss include: increasing the volume on TV, stereos, and other forms of media; difficulty with speech recognition, including asking people to repeat themselves or thinking that everybody is mumbling; mishearing or misunderstanding conversations; avoiding social settings and interactions; feeling stress, frustration, or annoyance in interactions; and experiencing difficulty hearing in a noisy situation.

Concerned about Hearing Loss?

Whether you are concerned about your hearing or for the hearing of a friend or loved one, we can help. Schedule an appointment with Aaron's Hearing Care. Dr. Liebman and his professional staff can evaluate your hearing and helpful provide solutions.

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